Museum the New Llano Colony



DeForest Sanford

Birth:  

Description:  

Pre-Colony History:  

Family Information: Father of Marvin Sanford.

 

Job in Colony: He was manager of the Llano Printshop and editor of the "Industrial Democrat" until January 1934 when he left the colony to run the print shop at Commonwealth College in Mena, Arkansas. By April he had returned to the colony and was again editor of the "Democrat."

In July 1934 the regular crew at the print shop included: Lloyd Potter, Harold and Mary Emery, Ben Low, Roy MacDonald, Anna Loutrel, George Leevey, Afton Lewis, Howard Stansbury, Mr. Ranft and Irene Hewitt.

Esther Allen, Mrs. Weatherwax and Bertha Richter helped out on the "Colonist" and "Democrat" days, plus both DeForest and Marvin Sanford could be seen there a good share of the time.  

Home in Colony:  

Other Info: In April 1934 a lovely gathering was held at the home of Frank Brough, another New Englander, to "God-speed" the Fay family to Norfolk, Connecticut where they hoped to arrange their affairs over the next few months and return to the colony in the fall.

Attendees enjoyed music, games and a wonderful lunch. They included: Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Archer, Drs. Robert K. and Cecil C. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. George Matz, Mrs. Maki, Smith Sanford, DeForest Sanford, George Leevey, Wm. Bingham, Dennis Stanley, Forest R. Waters, Mary Emery and the Brough family, consisting of Margaret, William and Frank.

He returned to the colony in November, 1935 from the Commonwealth College. With him came Kenneth Thurman who had left a couple of weeks prior to take a job which hadn't panned out.  

Post-Colony History: In 1940 he was in charge of art and photography for "The Searchlight (A Journal of Fundamental Democracy)" in San Francisco, California.  

Death:  

Sources: "Llano Colonist": April 21, 1934, July 7, 1934, September 8, 1934, November 2, 1935, November 9, 1935; "The Searchlight": September/October 1940  

Left: DeForest Sanford

Right: Drawing of Dad Sanford from the "Llano Colonist" dated November 2, 1935.