Museum the New Llano Colony



Michael A. Brattland  

Birth: He was born in October 1866 in Minnesota.  

Description:  

Pre-Colony History: On the 1900 and 1910 US Census he was listed as living with his wife and son, Armond (who never lived in the colony) while he worked as an attorney at law. In 1920 the couple were still in Minnesota and living with Armond and a daughter, Lois and he was listed as a lawyer and farmer.  

Family Information: Husband of Mabel Brattland; father of Lois Brattland.  

Job in Colony: Helped out whereever he was needed, including writing for the colony "diary". 

Home in Colony:  

Other Info: In 1928 he was one of the founding members of the local Conscientious Objectors Union; Theodore Atworth served as the first Secretary-Treasurer with O.E. Enfield serving as the President. The organization was planned to be international, composed of people who refused to go to war as a matter of conscience. Charter members included: Theodore Atworth, Mary H. Atworth, Emily H. Dougherty, I.A. Dougherty, Carl H. Gleeser, S. Weislander, Charlie C. Black, John Hight, Lowell H. Coate, W.A. Shutt, F.O. Jernberg, Reka Jernberg, Anna Tabb, Peter Kemp, F. Rosenburg, B. Wade Hewitt, Hamilton H. McClurg, W.J. Hoag, Theodore F. Landrum, C.N. Butts, Mary Snyder, George Snyder, Anna Garrett, Emma Shutt, M.A. Brattland, Richard P. Condon, Jr., Emily Swenson, W.J. Newman, George T. Pickett, Raymond DeFausell, S.E. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Molenar, Earl L. Bosch, Guy F. Rogers, Ora E. Newman, James J. Miller, Bert Busick, Mabel D. Busick, Ole Synoground, C.C. Mickey, Fred A. Jensen, Katie Mickey, F. Rahn and Isaac H. Keyes.

In March 1929, Llano's Male Quartet set off to visit Brownsville, Texas, camping along the way. Mr. Brattland was unanimously elected Head Chef, Comrade Stevens the Chief Engineer and Treasurer, Charles Eldred acted as Official Interpreter and Lowell Coate served as Road Guide and Official Can Opener.

Because of unavoidable delays on the first day of the trip, they eventually decided to drive all night, so as to arrive in time for the big Air Meet in which Lindbergh was to participate. They did arrive an hour before Lindbergh stepped into his Ford All-Metal Tri-Motored Plane to carry the first air mail from Texas to Mexico City (this despite the fact that all passenger service had been discontinued below the border due to the revolutionary activities there.)

The group was allowed to cross over the international bridge between Brownsville and Matamoras, but could travel no farther since all trains in that country were being used for troop movements. Along with a few souvenirs, they purchased a crate of oranges to take back to the colony, but at the first county line they were detained by a Federal officer who inquired if their fruit had been inspected. They hadn't realized it needed to be inspected so the officer insisted they would have to leave the fruit with him. Thinking very quickly, the group decided to juice the oranges and were able to take a nice jug of orange juice home, leaving the skins with the inspector, who was forced to admit he'd never seen it done like that before.  

Post-Colony History: In April 1929 the Brattlands returned to Minnesota after spending a winter at Llano. Mr. Brattland was a judge of the District Court there and had to get back to "the wheels of justice." The family did have plans to return in the fall and establish permanent residence in the colony, although this appears not to have happened. There is no further mention of them in the colony papers except for a trip in 1933 made by several colonists to Ada, Minnesota, which included a visit to the Brattland's home and the regular renewal of their subscription to the "Colonist".

In 1930 and 1940 the couple still lived in Minnesota with their daughter while their son and his family lived in the house next door. In 1930 he still worked as an attorney at law and in 1940 he was listed as a district judge.  

Death: He died in December 1940 in Minnesota and was buried there.  

Sources: US Census: 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, 1940; "Llano Colonist": December 22, 1928, March 30, 1929, April 6, 1929, April 27, 1929, July 22, 1933; "Vernon Parish Democrat": March 14, 1929; Minnesota Death Index; FindAGrave.com