Museum the New Llano Colony



Roscoe "Ross" Busick

Birth: He was born around 1913 in Michigan.  

Family Information:

Son of Bert and Mabel Busick.

Half-brother of Beulah and Charles Miller.

Brother of Fred, Vivian, Iris, Byron and Bill Busick.

Description:  

Pre-Colony History: The family came to the colony from Washington in March 1922.  

Home in Colony:  

Job in Colony: In April of 1922 he was part of a group of students who worked in the garden along with Emma Kapotsy, Bennett Babb, Dover Cryer, Fred Busick, Clifford Synoground, Harold Kemp, Dawson Cryer, Charles Lee, Brooks Merrel and Max Beavers.

In 1930 he was listed as a linotype operator in the print shop.

In September 1931 one hundred fifty sacks of beans and peas were picked in the forenoon by a volunteer crew of men, women and children. The crowd gathered a little after 7 am and was divided into different crews to look after different fields; by 11:30 the job was done. Volunteers included: Killian, Butts, Lloyd, Baldwin, Waters, Doc Williams, Quentin, Fred Busick, Roscoe Busick, Byron Busick, Vivian Busick, Graves, Webb, John Allred, Melvina Hullinger, Fred Levan, Goeke, Eldred, Tom Farrell, Claud Allred, Earl Swenson, Mackie, Frank Collins, George Collins, Boydelatour, Cleve Campbell, Mr. Caves, Clarence Long, Harry Rennick, Dee Kurtz, Pittman, Edminster, Walter Fread, Clarence Fread, Mrs. Herron, Woodruff, J.W. Gilbert, H.M. Wood, Winegar, Bert Moore, Lindwall, Ole Synoground, Rohr, Carnahan, Hoens, Mrs. Wooley, John Neill, Robert Roe, Warren Roe, Nesnow, Bartrum and B. Stevens.

In February 1934 he was a member of the Sunday Volunteer Gang including: Bill Heath, Charles Brown, Rob Roe, Walter Gaulke, Dad Thomas, Ernest Prodon, Bert Busick, Roscoe Busick, Gossett, Jack Carnahan, Ed Hiatt John Calgarry, Tom Cunningham, Phillips, Real Baril, Nick Lentz, Ed Mansfield, Septer Baldwin, F.W. Fay and F.S. Hammond. They spent the day cutting some eight hundred feet of cypress lumber into two-inch planks, twenty inches wide and as clear as a hound's tooth to be used for shingles.

In July 1936 he and Lionel Crossland relieved the situation at the power plant when they joined the "graveyard shift" there. Those old boilers were "gluttons for fuel" and there'd been a shortage of workers which had caused much trouble. 

Other Info: In 1928, he performed at a theater performance as part of a sextette which included Fred Jensen, Turner, Fischer, McLane and Landrum.

In April 1928 Miss Wilson was teaching piano classes to several boys and girls in the colony. The members of the Boys' Harmonica Club had had six weeks of classes and included Carl Besse, Roslyn Armacost, Robert Roe, Charles Wichmann, Kenneth Thurman, Isom Shoemaker, Roy Swenson, Fred and Roscoe Busick.

After the May Day Revolution of 1935, he signed a statement supporting John Szpila's letter, which had been published in the September 21, 1935 issue of the "Llano Colonist" and spelled out the reasons the overthrow of former General Manager, George T. Pickett, had been necessary.

Post-Colony History: The family returned to Puyallup, Washington after the colony failed.

Death:  

Sources: Family Source: Val Busick; "Llano Colonist": April 22, 1922, April 14, 1928, July 14, 1928, September 5, 1931, February 3, 1934, October 12, 1935, July 18, 1936; US Census: 1930  

Busick family taken around 1920.
Taken around 1920 (Back Row L to R) Roscoe Busick, Beulah & Charles Miller; (Front L to R) Bert holding Iris, Fred, Vivian and Mabel Busick.)

Busick family taken around 1960.
Busick Family taken about 1960 -- Front Row (L to R) Beulah, Bert, Mabel, Charles; Back Row (L to R) Iris, Fred, Bill, Byron, Roscoe, Vivian.

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